2017 is halfway done and while we’ve seen the release of some incredible games others have been huge disappointments. Here are the top five most disappointing games of 2017 so far.

5

The original Outlast was one of the scariest games made. With a sense of dread constantly looming over you and constantly scrambling for batteries made every dash feel like life or death. You would think that being trapped in an insane asylum, a predictable horror-genre trope, but thanks to horrifying deadly enemies the environment amplified the feeling that something was about to attack the asylum only added to the fear factor. It’s a shame that its sequel didn’t have the same level of excitement. This mainly due to heavy reliance on scripted chase sequences, a cliche story, and the lack of navigation through the labyrinth-like environments. Outlast 2 was more vexing than scary.

4

Another Ubisoft game that launched with technical problems. This has become an expected formula for Ubisoft games, especially new IPs. The first game launches with mediocre reception and issues then the sequel solves all the problems with the first game. It happened with Assassin’s Creed, Watch Dogs, and it’s looking it’ll happen with For Honor. The single-player campaign was a bland series of battles and the multiplayer mode was riddled with technical issues that caused PC many players to abandon the game, even threatening a boycott. Worst is that many gamers complained to Ubisoft about the pay-to-win micro transactions and slow leveling system. For Honor had a lot of interesting things, such as the deep combat system, but the problems outshined anything positive.

3

Yooka-Laylee promised to recapture the gameplay from classic platformer games and was considered a spiritual successor to the Banjo-Kazooie franchise. However, it lacked the charm found in the Banjo franchise that allowed it to age well. It didn’t help that Yooka-Laylee replicated the mechanics of games like Banjo-Kazooie that during the N64 era of platforming games were considered the height of the genre. Yooka-Laylee used these same mechanics but lacked charm and showed that using the same system without modernizing them like Insomniac Games did with Ratchet and Clank PS4 leads to a barebone mediocre experience. Yooka-Laylee was exactly what was promised when the Kickstarter went live, it just didn’t have the anything memorable to stand out from any other generic platformer.

2

Friday the 13th is an excellent adaptation of the popular horror-movie franchise until you figure that the entire game lacks reason to continue playing after a couple of matches. The game suffers from longevity issues and the expensive price of $40 is very steep considering the game’s content is severely lacking. While the developers have promised to include future free DLC to help supplement the game’s lack of options, for now, Friday the 13th is more of an expensive simulation for only the most dedicated Jason Voorhees fans.

1

Despite the truth about Mass Effect: Andromeda‘s difficult development surfacing thanks to a report by Kotaku it didn’t excuse all the problems that the game had. A predictable story, bland side-quests, and a myriad of technical issues ranging from unfair deaths to horrible facial animations.

We know that the project was plagued with issues from the start such as procedurally-generated worlds concept being dropped early in development, much of the finished game built in 18 months, and the understaffed animation department. What’s worst is that the franchise has been put on hiatus, meaning that the questions in the game’s campaign will go unsolved until BioWare decides to return to the franchise. If you’re vexed about Andromeda go back and play the original trilogy starring Commander Shepard, it still holds up today.

What were your most disappointing games of 2017? Let us know in the comments below!

About The Author

Adam S
Sr.Staff Writer

Adam is a Senior Staff Writer for GamerAssaultWeekly with over 5 years of experience in writing and is completely obsessed with video games. He holds a BA from Brooklyn College and lives in NY.